From Williamsburg

20110613-092752.jpg

Yet another fossil identification request, this time from Sean Moran, who is a student at the  College of William and Mary. Sean found this vertebra in the Late Miocene Cobham Bay Member of the Eastover Formation in Williamsburg.

This vertebra appears to be from a billfish, in the family Istiophoridae. In fact, it is a close match to a vertebra from a blue marlin, Makaira nigricans, from the Early Pliocene Sunken Meadow Member at the Lee Creek Mine in North Carolina. That specimen was illustrated in the following reference:

Fierstine, H. L., 2001. Analysis and New Records of Billfish (Teleostei: Perciformes: Istiophoridae) from the Yorktown Formation, Early Pliocene of Eastern North Carolina at Lee Creek Mine, in C. E. Ray and D. J. Bohaska, eds., Geology and Paleontology of the Lee Creek Mine, North Carolina, III, Smithsonian Contributions to Paleobiology No.90, Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC, p. 21-69.
Billfish have a pretty good fossil record in the Eastover and Yorktown Formations in Virginia and North Carolina. Another commonly-preserved element is the long rostral bones (the “sword”), such as this example in the VMNH collections from Surry County.

20110613-092841.jpg

Thanks to Sean for sending us the photo of his vertebra, and please keep sending us your images for identification. If nothing else, it keeps me on my toes!

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Chesapeake Group and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to From Williamsburg

  1. Jack Boyce says:

    I hunt the Peace River in South Florida. I have found what looks like a small belemnite. On The Fossil Forum (TFF) some have suggested Shark , Sawfish Rostral tooth or Marlin spike or Bill. I would like your thoughts — here is a link to discussion and Photos. http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/44302-a-gorgeous-day-on-the-river/ Shellseeker

  2. altondooley says:

    Based on your photos, I’m not sure. But I lean toward a worn sawfish rostral tooth. Some type of fish fin spine is not out of the question either, as sometimes they have a groove along the posterior margin.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s