Carmel Church-Day 3

JACKPOT! Just before lunch Brett uncovered a small piece of enamel from a tooth. Over the next several hours we removed the five land mammal teeth shown above. Two of them are visible below, still in the ground (the most obvious one is near the center of the picture, below the pick):

Land mammals are among the rarest of fossils from the Calvert Formation, which was deposited in the ocean. I haven’t definitely identified the teeth shown above yet, but I think they are from a rhinoceros. The rhinoceros Aphelops has been found in the Calvert Formation in Maryland, based on around 5 or 6 teeth found at various localities over the last 50 years. Whatever these teeth belong to, it’s a species we have never before seen at Carmel Church, and if it is a rhinoceros it’s the most complete one ever found in the Calvert. (Brett also discovered the most complete fossil horse ever found in the Calvert, a partial skull of Calippus found at Carmel Church in 2001 and currently on exhibit at VMNH.)

Volunteer Decker Chaney joined us today, and Carter Harrison stopped by to donate a hacksaw (which is why that’s disappeared from our “wishlist” on the home page-thanks, Carter.) After the excitement of the land mammal teeth, we took a lunch break…

…then continued following the whale dentaries (I’m pretty sure now that there are two of them):

We’ve already uncovered about three feet of the jaw on the left. The rhino teeth were found where the scale bar is sitting.

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This entry was posted in "Popeye", Carmel Church land mammals, Carmel Church mysticetes, Carmel Church Quarry, Chesapeake Group and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Carmel Church-Day 3

  1. Alexa says:

    Wow! Figures you find the cool stuff after I leave! Seriously, though, the land mammal teeth are pretty exciting. Looking forward to tomorrow’s update.

  2. Doug says:

    ooh, possible rhino teeth!

  3. Alton Dooley says:

    We found another land mammal tooth this morning. It’s a different species than yesterday’s teeth, much smaller.

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